China Oceanic Development Foundation: Yin Ping- I am looking forward to more cooperation between China and Vietnam

China Oceanic Development Foundation: Yin Ping- I am looking forward to more cooperation between China and Vietnam

BEIJING, Aug. 31, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — Red River winds its way between mountains and rice paddies billow in the wind. In the beautiful Red River Delta, Yin Ping and her team are doing field explorations.

“This is the perfect peat layer for dating. Take a sample here.” She pointed to the sediment core they just drilled up and discussed with Chinese and Vietnamese team members. As the chief scientist of the Comparative Study of the Holocene Sedimentary Evolution of the Yangtze and Red River Deltas, Yin Ping has excursed along the rivers many times to observe landscapes, collect samples and conduct experimental monitoring, from upstream to estuary.

Joint field excursion to the upper basin of the Red River in Yunnan Province, China
Joint field excursion to the upper basin of the Red River in Yunnan Province, China

Born in 1971, Yin Ping grew up in a mountain village abundant with mineral resources in Liaoning Province, China. Since an early age she had been obsessed with the geologists who visited to her village and various stone and mineral samples they collected and stories they knew about the earth; she then made up her mind to become a geologist. After high school she went to Qingdao Ocean University and majored in marine geology and got a PhD. Then, she went to Denmark and France as a visiting scientist and postdoctoral researcher. In 2002 she came back to China and continued research on coastal and marine environmental geology and geo-hazards. She is now the deputy director of the Qingdao Institute of Marine Geology, China Geological Survey.

“With increasing spatial utilization and socio-economic development on the coastal zones, more and more environmental problems appeared. I believe research and application in these fields can make a difference,” she said.

In 2011, an agreement on basic principles for solving maritime problems between China and Vietnam was signed, and under its framework China and Vietnam would promote cooperation on low-sensitive marine issues. The Comparative Study of the Holocene Sedimentary Evolution of the Yangtze and Red River Deltas was organized by Ministry of Natural Resources, People’s Republic of China and Ministry of Science and Technology, Vietnam.

“I have noticed that the Yangtze and Red River Deltas share a lot of similarities in terms of geological evolution, sedimentary characteristics, and vulnerability exposed to human impacts and climate changes, etc. I believe it is meaningful to start a joint comparative study and share our experiences.” Yin Ping said.

In June 2013, she met with Phung Van Phach, the former director of the Institute of Marine Geology and Geophysics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology. “He is a great partner and a rigorous scientist,” Yin Ping said, “We held many common views about cooperation and soon reached an agreement.” The Memorandum of Understanding was signed in October 2014 and the project, funded by both China and Vietnam, was launched in 2015.

“I believe that young scientists from both countries can make joint efforts and work together to build a maritime community with a shared future.” Over the years, 72 geoscientists from China and Vietnam joined the cooperation, carried out 8 field geological excursions and 7 academic seminars, and jointly published over 40 research papers. In addition, China offered a series of three-month training courses for young Vietnamese scientists, sharing knowledge, technique, and experiences in marine geoscience. “Through this program, we gained a lot. More importantly, we became good friends and keep close contact.” Yin Ping was extremely delighted that she gained such friendship through cooperation.

The knowledge and experience gained from this program really inspires her. The second phase of delta cooperation was granted recently. “Cooperating with scientists who are also committed to marine environmental protection is really great. There is still great potential for China and Vietnam in joint marine geoscience research. I look forward to more opportunities in the future.” Yin Ping said.